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POLICE ASSOCIATION OF NOVA SCOTIA 93 licensing of drivers, vehicle sanctions and remedial programs; and -Public safety should be given the highest priority in framing provincial and territorial impaired driving legislation. • Consistent with the expressed preference of most of the provinces and territories, MADD Canada has narrowed the scope of The 2006 Report Card relative to its 2000 and 2003 counterpart. In selecting the five core elements of The 2006 Rating Scale, priority was given to measures that will garner the greatest public support and have the most significant impact in reducing impaired driving crashes. The five core elements are outlined below: -a comprehensive graduated licensing program for all new drivers, including express police powers to enforce it; - a .00% BAC limit for all drivers under 21 or with less than five years driving experience; - express police powers to stop vehicles, establish sobriety checkpoints, and demand Standard Field Sobriety Testing from suspected alcohol and/or drugimpaired drivers; - a strengthening of the existing short-term roadside licence suspension programs for drivers with BACs of .05% or higher to include a 7-14 day licence suspension, a $150-$300 licence reinstatement fee, the recording of the suspension on the driver’s record, and mandatory remedial measures for repeat violations; and - mandatory alcohol interlock, vehicle impoundment and forfeiture, and remedial programs. • MADD Canada is generally pleased with the progress that has been made since 2003, and this is reflected in the fact that a majority of jurisdictions were awarded at least marginally higher grades in 2006 than in 2003. Almost all of the provinces and territories have introduced some measures to strengthen their impaired driving legislation since The 2003 Report Card. However, while some jurisdictions have made major strides, others have done relatively little. • Manitoba has again led the way in introducing important legislative reforms, and Newfoundland and Labrador, the Northwest Territories and Alberta have also made significant progress. • In contrast, Nova Scotia and Québec have fallen sharply in the rankings, and New Brunswick, Nunavut and Prince Edward Island have made little progress from their poor showing in 2003. • In the seven years since MADD Canada initiated this project, considerable progress has been made with respect to graduated licensing programs, provincial suspensions for federal impaired driving offences, and alcohol interlock, vehicle impoundment and remedial programs. On the other hand, the lack of progress in regard to police enforcement powers has been disappointing. • The provincial and territorial legislative summaries incorporated all relevant statutes and regulations, legislation that had been enacted but not yet proclaimed in force, and related information on government websites. We also took into account any pertinent administrative practices or policies that government officials brought to our attention prior to August 24, 2006. • Despite the considerable legislative improvements that some jurisdictions have made, impaired traffic deaths are rising in Canada. This troubling trend, coupled with the expected increase in young inexperienced drivers on our roads, highlights the need for continued strengthening of the provincial and territorial laws. • The chart on the following page summarizes the overall performance of the provinces and territories in 2006 and their ranking and grade from the previous comprehensive reviews. For a more detailed discussion of each jurisdiction’s 2006 ranking and grade, readers are encouraged to review the individual provincial and territorial summaries which start on page 20 of this report. (...Rating the Provinces continued) continued...

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