PANS-07

POLICE ASSOCIATION OF NOVA SCOTIA 57 SLEMON PARK — Making communities a better place to live is at the forefront of the goals of the Atlantic Police Academy’s new executive director. Edgar MacLeod, a 35-year veteran of police services, was last week officially named the new head of the Atlantic Police Academy at a ceremony at Slemon Park. MacLeod said the duties of police in this day and age go beyond dealing with crime and criminals. They also involve eliminating those elements within a community that breed crime and that happens in the development of young officers. “For me, training and education, the opportunity to shape the minds of young recruits, that is just a tremendous opportunity for me to be involved,” MacLeod said following the ceremony. “This is what it’s all about for me, trying to influence the new officers that will be going out into our streets.” MacLeod cited three areas that work together to build on serving the public — community, leadership and teamwork. “That’s what it’s all about,” he said. “It’s not about the police or the institution, it’s making the communities a better place to live. These recruits have a tremendous opportunity when they graduate to go out and reach out to people, to help people, to work in teamwork with other officers and with the community. Really and truly, that’s what it’s all about. That’s the message I want to get loud and clear.” MacLeod wants to create partnerships and work with the leadership within the community. “As much to be tough on crime but also to be tough on some of the underlying issues associated with crime,” he said. “Poverty, the lack of proper recreation and work with the communities to do those things so that we’re actually altering the conditions where crime would otherwise breed if you don’t have good recreation, if you don’t have literacy and good education, good health services. This is about a collaborative approach and bringing it all back to one thing, one common denominator — it’s about the community.” MacLeod graduated from the Atlantic Police Academy in 1973 in Squad 4 and is the first academy graduate to be named executive director. After graduation, he went on to a storied police career with the Charlottetown, Shelburne, New Waterford and Sydney departments before becoming the first chief of the Cape Breton Regional Police Service. He is past president of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police and has received numerous awards including an honorary doctor of law degree from Cape Breton University. (summerside@theguardian.pe.ca) Making Communities Better Place Key Goal of Police Academy Leader W J.R. (Mac) Macdonald, right, former Summerside police chief and the founding director of the Atlantic Police Academy, presents Edgar Macleod with the police academyʼs executive directorʼs badge during a recent ceremony at the academy. Macleod, who graduated from the academy in 1973, is the first graduate to be named executive director of the institution. Guardian photo by Mike Carson As originally published The Guardian, January 28, 2008 “Itʼs not about the police or the institution, itʼs making the communities a better place to live. These recruits have a tremendous opportunity when they graduate to go out and reach out to people, to help people, to work in teamwork with other officers and with the community. Really and truly, thatʼs what itʼs all about. Thatʼs the message I want to get loud and clear.” Edgar MacLeod, Atlantic Police Academy executive director Edgar MacLeod first academy graduate to become institution’s executive director By MIKE CARSON - THE GUARDIAN

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